Archive for MySQL Replication

MySQL 5.6 Replication Webinar

Update – the recording of this webinar is now available here.

This Wednesday (27th March) Mat Keep and I will be presenting a free, live webinar on MySQL 5.6 Replication. You need to register here ahead of the webinar – worth doing even if you can’t attend as you’ll then be sent a link to the replay when it’s available. We’ll also have some of the key MySQL replication developers on-line to answer your questions and so it’s also a great chance to get some free consultancy 😉

Details….

Join this session to learn how the new replication features in MySQL 5.6 enable developers and DBAs to build and scale next generation services using the world’s most popular open source database. MySQL 5.6 delivers new replication capabilities which we will discuss and demonstrate in the webinar:

  • High performance with Binary Log Group Commit, Multi-Threaded Slaves and Optimized Row Based Replication
  • High availability with Global Transaction Identifiers, Failover Utilities and Crash Safe Slaves & Binlog
  • Data integrity with Replication Event Checksums
    Dev/Ops agility with new Replication Utilities, Time Delayed Replication and more

The session will wrap up with resources to get started with MySQL 5.6.

WHEN:
Wed, Mar 27: 07:00 Pacific time (America)
Wed, Mar 27: 08:00 Mountain time (America)
Wed, Mar 27: 09:00 Central time (America)
Wed, Mar 27: 10:00 Eastern time (America)
Wed, Mar 27: 14:00 UTC
Wed, Mar 27: 14:00 Western European time
Wed, Mar 27: 15:00 Central European time
Wed, Mar 27: 16:00 Eastern European time
Wed, Mar 27: 19:30 India, Sri Lanka
Wed, Mar 27: 22:00 Singapore/Malaysia/Philippines time
Wed, Mar 27: 22:00 China time
Wed, Mar 27: 23:00 日本
Thu, Mar 28: 01:00 NSW, ACT, Victoria, Tasmania (Australia)

The presentation will be approximately 60 minutes long.





MySQL 5.6 GA – Replication Enhancements

Multi-Threaded Slave

Multi-Threaded Slave

MySQL 5.6 has now been declared Generally Available (i.e. suitable for production use). This is a very exciting release from a MySQL replication perspective with some big new features. These include:

  • Global Transaction Identifiers (GTIDs) – a unique identifier that is used accross your replication topology to identify a transaction. Makes setting up and managing your cluster (including the promotion of a new master) far simpler and more reliable.
  • Multi-threaded slaves (MTS) – Increases the performance of replication on the slave; different threads will handle applying events to different databases.
  • Binary Log Group Commit – Improves replication performance on the master.
  • Optimized Row Based Replication – reduces the amount of data that needs to be replicated; reducing network usage and potentially speeding up replication.
  • Crash-Safe Replication – makes replication transactional. The data and replication positioning information are both updated as part of the same transaction.
  • Replication Event Checksums – checks to ensure that the data being replicated hasn’t become corrupted, avoids writing corrupted data to the slave.
  • Time-Delayed Replication – configure one or more of your slaves to only apply replicated events after a configured time. This can be useful to protect against DBA mistakes.
  • Informational Logs – includes the original statement in the binary log when using row-based-replication to aid in debugging.

To coincide with the GA announcement, a new white paper has been released – MySQL 5.6 Replication An Introduction – that provides a lot more details on these new features. We’ve also released a second white paper – MySQL 5.6 Replication, Enhancing Scalability and Availability – A Tutorial that steps you through using MySQL Replication, with a particular focus on the new features.

If you’re already familiar with using MySQL Replication, here are a few pointers on what to do differently for the new MySQL 5.6 features but you should refer to the full tutorial to see these changes in context.

First of all, here are some extra configuration parameters to include…

[mysqld]
gtid-mode=on				# GTID
enforce-gtid-consistency=true		# GTID
master-info-repository=TABLE            # Chrash-safe replication
relay-log-info-repository=TABLE         # Chrash-safe replication
slave-parallel-workers=2                # MTS
binlog-checksum=CRC32                   # Checksums
master-verify-checksum=1                # Checksums
slave-sql-verify-checksum=1             # Checksums
binlog-rows-query-log_events=1          # Informational logs

When initiating (or restarting) replication on the slave, it is no longer necessary to include the binary log positioning information as the master and slave will automatically negotiate what outstanding events need to be replicated based on any GTIDs previously received by the slave…

slave> CHANGE MASTER TO MASTER_HOST='black', 
                        MASTER_USER='repl_user', 
                        MASTER_PASSWORD='billy', 
                        MASTER_AUTO_POSITION=1;

Please try out these new features and let us know what you think.





Upcoming conferences to learn more about MySQL Cluster & Replication

There are a couple of conferences coming up where you can expect to learn about the latest developments in MySQL Cluster and MySQL Replication (as well as what else is happening in MySQL 5.6).

The first is the Oracle MySQL Innovation Day which is being held in Oracle HQ at Redwood Shores. This is an all-day event on 5th June – unfortunately I won’t be able to attend this one but there will be lots of great Cluster and replication sessions. If you can’t make it out to California then there will be a live Webcast. You can register here to attend in person or join the webcast.

The second is MySQL Connect – this runs the weekend before Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco; it’s not  until 29th September but it’s worth registering now to get the early bird pricing and save $500 (end 13th July). There are lots of great sessions lined up both from the MySQL experts within Oracle and users and community members.





Upcoming webinar: MySQL 5.6 Replication – For Next Generation of Web and Cloud Services

MySQL 5.6 Replication - Global Transaction IDs

MySQL 5.6 Replication - Global Transaction IDs

On Wednesday (16th May 2012), Mat Keep and I will be presenting the new replication features that are previewed as part of the latest MySQL 5.6 Development Release. If you’d like to attend then register here.

MySQL 5.6 delivers new replication capabilities which we will discuss in the webinar:

  • High performance with Multi-Threaded Slaves and Optimized Row Based Replication
  • High availability with Global Transaction Identifiers, Failover Utilities and Crash Safe Slaves & Binlog
  • Data integrity with Replication Event Checksums
  • Dev/Ops agility with new Replication Utilities, Time Delayed Replication and more

The session will wrap up with resources to get started with MySQL 5.6 and an opportunity to ask questions.

The webinar will last 45-60 minutes and will start on Wednesday, May 16, 2012 at 09:00 Pacific time (America); start times in other time zones:

  • Wed, May 16: 06:00 Hawaii time
  • Wed, May 16: 10:00 Mountain time (America)
  • Wed, May 16: 11:00 Central time (America)
  • Wed, May 16: 12:00 Eastern time (America)
  • Wed, May 16: 16:00 UTC
  • Wed, May 16: 17:00 Western European time
  • Wed, May 16: 18:00 Central European time
  • Wed, May 16: 19:00 Eastern European time

As always, it’s worth registering even if you can’t make the live webcast as you’ll  be emailed a link to the replay as soon as it’s available.





MySQL 5.6 Replication Enhancements – webinar replay

Global Transaction IDs - simplifying replication management

The replay has now been released for the MySQL 5.6 replication enhancements replay where you can get the latest information on all of the great new content that has been included in the MySQL 5.6 Development Releases as well as some features that are still being developed. You can view the replay here.

Some of the topics discussed are:

  • Enhanced data integrity: Global Transactions Identifiers, Crash-Safe Slaves and Replication Event Checksums;
  • High performance: Multi-Threaded Slaves, Binlog Group Commit and Optimized Row-Based Replication;
  • Improved flexibility: Time Delayed Replication, Multi-Source Replication, Binlog API and Informational Log Events




Delayed Replication in MySQL 5.6 Development Release

The new Development Release for MySQL 5.6 contains a great feature that our users have been asking for for a while (work log 344 first raised in 2010!) – delayed replication.

Stop mistake being propagated

The concept (and as you’ll see the execution) is extremely simple. If a user makes a mistake on the master – such as dropping some critical tables – then we want to give them the opportunity to recover the situation by using the data held on one of the slaves. The problem is that the slave is busily trying to keep up with the master and in all likelihood will have dropped these tables before the user has time to pull the plug on the replication stream. What this feature does is give the DBA the option to introduce a configurable delay into the replication process so that they have time to cut it off before the mistake is propagated.

This blog explains how this works, how to set that up and then how to bring the slave up to date (to the point in time just before the mistake was made on the master).

MySQL Replication Implementation

To understand how this is implemented, it helps to have a little bit of background on how MySQL replication is implemented. When a change is made on the master, it is applied to the master’s local disk copy and then written to the binary log. The change is then asynchronously (but normally immediately) copied from the master’s binary log to the relay log on the slave; from there an SQL thread on the slave will read the change from the relay log and apply it to the slave’s copy of the data.

This feature works by allowing the user to configure a delay between when the change is applied on the master and when that change is taken from the relay log and applied to the slave. Note that if the master fails during this delay period then the change is not lost as it is has already been safely recorded in the slave’s relay log.

Immediate & Delayed Replication

As the delay is implemented on the slave, you are free to use ‘real-time’ replication to one slave (to allow the fastest possible failover if the master fails) and delayed replication to a second slave to guard against user error. This is the setup that this post steps through.

For simplicity, all three MySQL Servers will be run on a single host but each uses a different port number as shown in the diagram. “slave” will apply changes as quickly as it can while “slave2” will introduce a delay when applying changes from its relay log.

Setting up the first slave is very standard:

master> CREATE USER repl_user@localhost;
master> GRANT REPLICATION SLAVE ON *.* TO 
  repl_user@localhost IDENTIFIED BY 'pw';
slave> CHANGE MASTER TO
 -> MASTER_HOST = 'localhost',
 -> MASTER_PORT = 3306,
 -> MASTER_USER = 'repl_user',
 -> MASTER_PASSWORD = 'pw';
slave> start slave;
When setting up the delayed slave, one extra parameter is included in the CHANGE MASTER command:
slave2> CHANGE MASTER TO
 -> MASTER_HOST = 'localhost',
 -> MASTER_PORT = 3306,
 -> MASTER_USER = 'repl_user',
 -> MASTER_PASSWORD = 'pw',
 -> MASTER_DELAY = 20;
slave2> START SLAVE;
The MASTER_DELAY parameter indicates the delay in seconds (here I’ve used 20 seconds – in a production environment you’d probably want to give your self much longer.
Prior to this, a simple table had already been created:
master> CREATE DATABASE clusterdb;USE clusterdb;
master> CREATE TABLE towns (Town VARCHAR(20));
Next we check that changes are immediately applied on slave while delayed on slave2:
master> INSERT INTO towns VALUES ("Maidenhead"),("Bray");
slave> SELECT * FROM towns;
 +------------+
 | Town       |
 +------------+
 | Maidenhead |
 | Bray       |
 +------------+
slave2> SELECT * FROM towns;
 Empty set (0.00 sec)

slave2> SELECT * FROM towns;
 +------------+
 | Town       |
 +------------+
 | Maidenhead |
 | Bray       |
 +------------+
The next step is to simulate a user error; I add some more data to the table and then drop the table. Following on from that I stop the replication on slave2 before the mistake is applied:
master> INSERT INTO towns VALUES ("Cookham"),("Marlow");
master> DROP TABLE towns;
slave> SELECT * FROM tables;
     ERROR 1146 (42S02): Table 'clusterdb.tables' doesn't exist
slave2> STOP SLAVE;
slave2> SELECT * FROM towns;
 +------------+
 | Town       |
 +------------+
 | Maidenhead |
 | Bray       |
 +------------+

Bring the Slave up to the Desired Point in Time

This is a good start, while slave has dropped the table, it still exists on slave2. Unfortunately, slave2 is missing the additions to the table that were made just before the mistake was made. The next step is to bring slave 2 almost up to date – stopping just before the table was dropped. To do this we need to find the position within the master’s binary log just before the table was dropped – this can be done using the SHOW BINLOG EVENTS command on the master. Once we have that position (file-name + position) we can tell slave 2 to catch up just to that point using START SLAVE UNTIL . Once that has been done, I check that the extra 2 inserts have been applied to slave2:

master> SHOW BINLOG EVENTSG
....
*************************** 10. row ***************************
 Log_name: ws2-bin.000001
 Pos: 842
 Event_type: Query
 Server_id: 1
 End_log_pos: 957
 Info: use `clusterdb`; INSERT INTO towns VALUES ("Cookham"),("Marlow")
 *************************** 11. row ***************************
 Log_name: ws2-bin.000001
 Pos: 957
 Event_type: Xid
 Server_id: 1
 End_log_pos: 984
 Info: COMMIT /* xid=32 */
 *************************** 12. row ***************************
 Log_name: ws2-bin.000001
 Pos: 984
 Event_type: Query
 Server_id: 1
 End_log_pos: 1096
 Info: use `clusterdb`; DROP TABLE `towns` /* generated by server */
slave2> START SLAVE UNTIL
 -> MASTER_LOG_FILE='ws2-bin.000001',
 -> MASTER_LOG_POS=984;
slave2> SELECT * FROM towns;
 +------------+
 | Town       |
 +------------+
 | Maidenhead |
 | Bray       |
 | Cookham    |
 | Marlow     |
 +------------+

Success! Now slave2 contains exactly the data we need. After this it’s up to you what to do next; typically this could involve promoting slave2 to be the new master.

If you want to try this out for yourselves then you can download the MySQL 5.6 Milestone Development Release from dev.mysql.com (select the Development Maintenance Release sub-tab to get MySQL 5.6).





Feature Preview – Multi-Threaded Replication Slaves

This week, MySQL released a feature-preview – the ability to have multiple threads on the slave so that it is better able to keep pace with the updates being applied on the master. To simplify potential sequencing issues, all updates for a particular database will be handled by the same thread – in other words you need to make sure that your application uses multiple databases in order to see the benefits.
Luís Soares (from the development team) has written a great Blog going into the details.





New white paper – MySQL Replication – Enhancing Scalability and Availability with MySQL 5.5

MySQL Replication from 1 Master to Multiple Slaves

A new white paper has been published that covers MySQL Replication – background information, how it works, how to use it and what’s new in MySQL 5.5. Simply register for the white paper at mysql.com and you’ll be sent your free copy.

The paper starts by covering the fundamental concepts behind replication such as the difference between synchronous and asynchronous replication and the idea behind semisynchronous replication.

It goes on to describe the common use-cases for replication – scaling out, high availability, geographic redundancy and offloading backups or analytics.

Various replication topologies are discussed from simple master-slave to multi-master rings.

As the title of the paper suggests, the paper covers the significant replication changes introduced in MySQL 5.5:

  • Semisynchronous replication: Improved resilience by having master wait for slave to persist events.
  • Slave fsync tuning & Automatic relay log recovery: Option to dictate when relay logs are written to disk rather than relying on default operating system behavior; set sync_relay_log=1 to ensure that no more than 1 statement or transaction is missing from the relay log after a crash. The slave can now recover from corrupted relay logs by requesting corrupt entries to be resent from the master. Three new options are introduced (sync-master-info, sync-relay-log and sync-relay-log-info)
  • Replication Heartbeat: Automatically checks the status of the connection between the master and the slave(s), allowing a more precise failure detection mechanism. Can detect loss of connection within milliseconds (configurable). Avoid unnecessary relay log rotation when the master is idle.
  • Per server replication filtering: When a server is removed from a replication ring, a surviving server can be selected to remove its outstanding replication messages once they’ve been applied by all servers.
  • Precise Slave Type Conversions: Allows different types to be used on the master and slave, with automatic type promotion and demotion when using row-based replication (already possible with statement-based replication)
  • Individual Log Flushing: Selectively flush server logs when using ‘FLUSH LOGS’ for greater control
  • Safe logging of mixed transactions: Replicate transactions containing both InnoDB and MyISAM changes

To be better able to use replication, it helps to understand the basics about how MySQL Replication has been implemented – for example the roles of the binary and relay logs and so this is covered.

Perhaps the most useful sections are those that actually walk through using MySQL Replication – specifically these activities:

  • Configuring, running and testing replication
  • Migrating from traditional asynchronous replication to semisynchronous replication
  • Administering & monitoring replication (including MySQL Enterprise Monitor)
  • Failover and recovery

Replication is a little different when using MySQL Cluster; most significantly because you can have multiple MySQL Servers and other application nodes modifying the same database but also because the domains where MySQL Cluster has been used have required extreme High Availability and so there are Cluster-unique features such as active-active replication with conflict detection and resolution. This paper isn’t focussed on MySQL Cluster but a summary of these differences is included.





Software preview MySQL Scriptable Replication

Fig. 1 MySQL per-row replication filtering

Fig. 1 MySQL per-row replication filtering

A MySQL Software preview is available which allows you to write Lua scripts to control replication on a statement-by-statement basis. Note that this is prototype functionality and is not supported but feedback on its usefulness would be gratefully received.The final version would allow much greater functionality but this preview allows you to implement filters on either the master or slave to examine the statements being replicated and decide whether to continue processing each one or not.

After reading this article, you may be interested in trying this out for yourself and want to create your own script(s). You can get more information on the functionality and download the special version of MySQL from http://forge.mysql.com/wiki/ReplicationFeatures/ScriptableReplication

To understand how this feature works, you first need to understand the very basics about how MySQL replication works. Changes that are made to the ‘Master’ MySQL Server are written to a binary log. Any slave MySQL Servers that subscribe to this master are sent the data from the master’s binary log; the slave(s) then copy this data to their own relay log(s). The slave(s) will then work through all of the updates in their relay logs and apply them to their local database(s). The implementation is a little more complex when using MySQL Cluster as the master’s updates may come through multiple MySQL Servers or directly from an application through the NDB API but all of the changes will still make it into the binary log.

MySQL Replication supports both statement and row based replication (as well as mixed) but this software preview is restricted to statement based replication. As MySQL Cluster must use row based replication this preview cannot be used with Cluster but the final implementation should work with all storage engines.

As show in Fig. 1 there are 4 points where you can choose to filter statements being replicated:

  1. Before the update is written to the binary log
  2. After the update has been read from the binary log
  3. Before the update is written to the relay log
  4. After the update has been read from the relay log

The final 2 interest me most as it allows us to have multiple slaves which apply different filters – this article includes a worked example of how that could be exploited.

Fig. 2 Details for each filtering point

Fig. 2 Details for each filtering point

The filters are written as Lua scripts. The names of the script file, module name and function names vary depending on which of these filtering points is to be used. Fig. 2 shows these differences. In all cases, the scripts are stored in the following folder: “<mysql-base-directory>/ext/replication”.

This article creates 2 different scripts – one for each of 2 slave servers. In both cases the filter script is executed after an update is read from the relay log. One slave will discard any statement of the form “INSERT INTO <table-name> SET sub_id = 401, …” by searching for the sub string “sub_id = X” where X is even while the second slave will discard any where X is odd. Any statement that doesn’t include this pattern will be allowed through.

Fig. 3 Implementation of odd/even sharded replication

Fig. 3 Implementation of odd/even sharded replication

If a script returns TRUE then the statement is discarded, if it returns FALSE then the replication process continues. Fig. 3 shows the architecture and pseudo code for the odd/even replication sharding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The actual code for the two slaves is included here:

slave-odd: <mysql-base-directory>/ext/replication/relay_log.lua
function after_read(event)
  local m = event.query
  if m then
    id = string.match(m, "sub_id = (%d+)")
    if id then
      if id %2 == 0 then
        return true
      else
        return false
      end
    else
      id = string.match(m, "sub_id=(%d+)")
        if id then
          if id %2 == 0 then
            return true
          else
            return false
          end
       else
         return false
       end
    end
  else
    return false
  end
end
slave-even: <mysql-base-directory>/ext/replication/relay_log.lua
function after_read(event)
  local m = event.query
  if m then
    id = string.match(m, "sub_id = (%d+)")
    if id then
      if id %2 == 1 then
        return true
      else
        return false
      end
    else
      id = string.match(m, "sub_id=(%d+)")
        if id then
          if id %2 == 1 then
            return true
          else
            return false
          end
       else
         return false
       end
    end
  else
    return false
  end
end

Replication can then be set-up as normal as described in Setting up MySQL Asynchronous Replication for High Availability with the exception that we use 2 slaves rather than 1.

Once replication has been started on both of the slaves, the database and tables should be created; note that for some reason, the creation of the tables isn’t replicated to the slaves when using this preview load and so the tables actually need to be created 3 times:

mysql-master> CREATE DATABASE clusterdb; mysql-master> USE clusterdb; mysql-master> CREATE TABLE sys1 (code INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, country VARCHAR (30)) engine=innodb; mysql-master> CREATE TABLE subs1 (sub_id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, code INT) engine=innodb;
mysql-slave-odd> USE clusterdb; mysql-slave-odd> CREATE TABLE sys1 (code INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, country VARCHAR (30)) engine=innodb; mysql-slave-odd> create table subs1 (sub_id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, code INT) engine=innodb;
mysql-slave-even> USE clusterdb; mysql-slave-even> CREATE TABLE sys1 (code INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, country VARCHAR (30)) engine=innodb; mysql-slave-even> CREATE TABLE subs1 (sub_id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, code INT) engine=innodb;

The data can then be added to the master and then the 2 slaves can be checked to validate that it behaved as expected:

mysql-master> INSERT INTO sys1 SET area_code=33, country="France";
mysql-master> INSERT INTO sys1 SET area_code=44, country="UK";
mysql-master> INSERT INTO subs1 SET sub_id=401, code=44;
mysql-master> INSERT INTO subs1 SET sub_id=402, code=33;
mysql-master> INSERT INTO subs1 SET sub_id=976, code=33;
mysql-master> INSERT INTO subs1 SET sub_id=981, code=44;
mysql-slave-odd> SELECT * FROM sys1;
+------+---------+
| code | country |
+------+---------+
|  33  | France  |
|  44  | UK      |
+------+---------+

mysql-slave-odd> SELECT * FROM subs1;
+--------+------+
| sub_id | code |
+--------+------+
|   401  | 44   |
|   981  | 44   |
+--------+------+
Fig. 4 Results of partitioned replication

Fig. 4 Results of partitioned replication

mysql-slave-even> SELECT * FROM sys1;
+------+---------+
| code | country |
+------+---------+
|  33  | France  |
|  44  | UK      |
+------+---------+
mysql-slave-even> SELECT * FROM subs1;
+--------+------+
| sub_id | code |
+--------+------+
|   402  | 33   |
|   976  | 33   |
+--------+------+

Fig. 4 illustrates this splitting of data between the 2 slaves – all rows from the system table are stored in both databases (as well as in the master) while the data in the subscriber table (and it would work for multiple subscriber tables too) are partitioned between the 2 databases – odd values in one, even in the other. Obviously, this could be extended to more slaves by changing the checks in the scripts.

As an illustration of how this example could be useful, all administrative data could be provisioned into and maintained by the master – both system and subscriber data. Each slave could then serve a subset of the subscribers, providing read-access to the administrative data andread/write access for the more volatile subscriber data (which is mastered on the ‘slave’). In this way, there can be a central point to manage the administrative data while being able to scale out to multiple, databases to provide maximum capacity and performance to the applications. For example, in a telco environment, you may filter rows by comparing a subscriber’s phone number to a set of area codes so that the local subscribers are accessed from the local database – minimising latency.

From a data integrity perspective, this approach is safe if (and only if) the partitioning rules ensures that all related rows are on the same slave (in our example, all rows from all tables for a particular subscriber will be on the same slave – so as long as we don’t need transactional consistency between different subscribers then this should be safe).

Fig. 5 Partioned replication for MySQL Cluster

Fig. 5 Partitioned replication for MySQL Cluster

As mentioned previously this software preview doesn’t work with MySQL Cluster but looking forward to when it does, the example could be extended by having each of the slave servers be part of the same Cluster. In this case, the partitioned data will be consolidated back into a single database (for this scenario, you would likely configure just one server to act as the slave for the system data). On the face of it, this would be a futile exercise but in cases where the performance bottlenecks on the throughput of a single slave server, this might be a way to horizontally scale the replication performance for applications which make massive numbers of database writes.





MySQL Cluster: Geographic Replication Deep-Dive webinar

I will be presenting a free Webinar on Geographic Replication for MySQL Cluster at 9:00 am (UK time) on Tuesday 24 November.
Multi-Master Replication for HA with MySQL Cluster

Multi-Master Replication for HA with MySQL Cluster

MySQL Cluster has been deployed into some of the most demanding web, telecoms and enterprise /
government workloads, supporting 99.999% availability with real time performance and linear write scalability.

You can register on-line here.

Tune into this webinar where you can hear from the MySQL Cluster product management team provide a detailed “deep dive” into one of MySQL Cluster’s key capabilities – Geographic Replication.

In this session, you will learn how using Geographic Replication enables your applications to:

  • Achieve higher levels of availability within a data center or across a WAN
  • Locate data closer to users, providing lower latency access
  • Replicate to other MySQL storage engines for complex data analysis and reporting of real time data
  • Gow to get started with Geographic Replication

Tuesday, November 24, 2009: 10:00 Central European time

  • Tue, Nov 24:  09:00 Western European time
  • Tue, Nov 24:  11:00 Eastern European time

The presentation will be approximately 1 hour long, including on-line Q&A.